Friday, April 11, 2008

Week 9, #23

In the right sidebar of the MSLA School Library Learning 2.0 blog is an attribution stating: Learning 2.0 is a discovery learning program created by Helene Blowers. Content and style for School Library Learning 2.0 and Classroom Learning 2.0 have been borrowed and duplicated with permission, under a Creative Commons License

What were your favorite discoveries or exercises on this learning journey? LibraryThing. I found it to be personally and professionally useful. The Blog and various widgets were fun to use. Zoho has been placed on our district's website to encourage its' use.

How has this program assisted or affected your lifelong learning goals? I will aggressively continue to keep abreast of changes in technology that will benefit my students. There will always be change.

Were there any take-a-ways or unexpected outcomes from this program that surprised you? Everything surprised, and excited. It was an adventure. Del.icio.us has been great and the concept of tagging and tag clouds is a good example for visual learners. I promise that the "Fair(ly) Use Tale" will be used in our district with acknowledgement, of course.

What could we do differently to improve upon this program’s format or concept? I know 9 weeks seems like a long time but with work and life in general there were times I just couldn't get it done. Offering it as a summer course might work better for some.

If we offered another discovery program like this in the future, would you choose to participate? Absolutely

How would you describe your learning experience in ONE WORD or in ONE SENTENCE, so we could use your words to promote CSLA learning activities? Exhilarating, overwhelming, ultimately rewarding both personally and professionally.

Week 9, #22

When you start exploring the Gutenburg Collection you might get overwhelmed. I chose to scan the top 100 downloads which gives a sampling of the variety of the collection. When you check advanced search you find foreign language books; downloadable films including the Moon Landing and the first Atomic Bomb test; music; sheet music; recordings of presidential speeches, visits to Edison's Laboratory and first person commentary of the bombing of Hiroshima & Nagasaki (computer generated voice) and data including the Human Genome Project. This is great primary source stuff! The books are in the public domain so they are old. I found one of my childhood favorites Freckles by Gene Stratton Porter copyright 1904.

I was disappointed though not surprised by the 1000 ebook collection for the "One Laptop, One Child" Project. These are really old copies of classic and not so classic literature. Not so sure the recipients are going to be interested. These might be useful for a perspective on Children's Literature.

"The World Public Library" makes a variety of collections available for the paltry fee of $8.95 annually. My son highly recommends the Baen Library Collection which contains military sci fi. He has a Sony Reader which makes this easier to use. I've tried reading books on a computer, even a laptop, and found it very uncomfortable. The handheld reader that looks like a thin paperback comes closer to the feel of a real book.

Week 9, #21

I have iTunes on my computer so I went to the podcasts and found "Hey Mr. Green" from the Sierra Club. Since Earth Day is coming up it seemed appropriate. He has great little snippets on how to recycle, disposing of refrigerators etc. and its FREE. I subscribed to the RSS feed but it will show up in my iTunes Library.


Podcast.net is easy to use and and navigate. I searched using the term "libraries" and discovered mostly academic libraries. There was a series of podcasts called "Talking with Talis." The latest podcast discussed the 2008 edition of the Horizon Report and its implications for Higher Education. I subscribed to the RSS feed because the topics seemed to include many Web 2.0 applications.

Thursday, April 10, 2008

Week 9, #20

I found YouTube to be amusing and frustrating. There were lots of silly, funny, entertaining videos. If I had all night I'd probably get lost in there. However I was searching for content that I could share with my classes. I selected Science & Technology category and found it to to full of the ongoing battle between "Anonymous" and Scientology. Even when I narrowed the results by Top Rated and All Time I still found nothing really worthwhile or the download took too long. I changed to Pets & Animals category and found some great BBC videos but the embedding was disabled. This is a video of Beluga Whales. I chose it because in their study of ocean life the first grade learns the song "Baby Beluga."

Week 8, #19

I love Library Thing! I found it during Week 5 when we had to look at an award winning site. I hadn't looked at the up coming exercises so I pretty much covered it. This time I did add more books to my library and was pleased to note that the changes showed up in the widget on my blog. I played with the display styles and found that "E" shows subject heading and LC numbers. It would be fun to have students post their favorite books to a "Library" or check out a discussion of a summer reading book? I really think that this would be a great addition to any library catalog or website.

Week 8, #18

So here's my Zoho document. I played around with some of the formatting options, as you can see. I was offered more easily accessible options than I get in Word. This is actually going to be useful because we're planning the next volunteer breakfast and we can add suggestions, notes and view past versions. I can make this available to a limited group or anyone. I added myself to the shared list and received an email shortly thereafter. Very cool. You do have to remember to save the document in order to publish or share. This application is great for meeting notes or the AUP I mentioned in the previous post. You can highlight changes or important points.

Volunteer Breakfast Notes

June 14, 2007 ~

Thoughts about:

  • Don’t have last week of school, Beginning of June would be better
  • Parents bring children, next year have stories/coloring sheets/video in librarysmile
  • Send invitations 2 weeks prior RSVP (regrets only) needs to include number of children
  • Grade level coordinators should be the organizers

We had 40-60 people including children

Menu/Misc

  • Small, mini Pastry –Danish, croissants, bagels
  • Spreads for bagels
  • Donut holes – for kids ~ 3 boxes
  • Punch – use oj, pineapple, mango Gloria Stewart made ice ring
  • Coffee – buy from Maggie, buy flavored cream, ½ + ½
  • Tea - ?
  • Fruit – grapes, strawberries, blueberries, pineapple
  • Paper goods – punch cups, small plates, napkins, tablecloths (2 tables), plastic silverware

Week 7, #16

I looked at SJCPL Subject Guides and was very impressed with the content of the Homework Guide. The format with the sidebar of resources is easy to navigate and understand. Found it somewhat similar to the "Homework Bookmarks" Librarians are the only ones to edit content. Went to the discussion tab - what a shocker! Someone has filled the page with links to questionable sites. So there's a caveat to public wikis. Book Lover's Wiki from the Princeton Library is a great idea for summer reading or classroom reading. I like the ability to edit, roll back and add content like book covers and links to author sites. I'd like to understand the advantages of a wiki over a blog for this application. Teacherlibrarian wiki is a great resource for information literacy skills at all levels, booklists and links to other helpful sites. It appears to be in its infancy- not a lot of of content in some areas- but very useful nonetheless. I love the idea of using a wiki for collaborative notetaking. I serve on the Technology Vertical Curriculum team. We could have used a wiki to revise our AUP and post collaborative notes after each meeting.